The Women of Amphissa
700 x 408 • 91 KB
From the gallery card at the Clark Institute:
The painting depicts an obscure story recorded by the first-century Greek writer Plutarch: a group of bacchantes from Phocis awaken after a night of celebrating the rites of Bacchus. They find themselves in the marketplace of Amphissa, a town at war with Phocis. The women of the town have been guarding the sleeping revelers, protecting them from attack by soldiers. Characteristic of Victorian fascination with languorous women in ancient dress, the painting was awarded the Gold Medal of Honor when it was exhibited at the Universal Exposition of Paris in 1889.
Owner/Location: Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute - Williamstown, MA (United States)
Dates: 1887
Artist age:Approximately 51 years old.
Dimensions: Height: 129.9 cm (51.14 in.), Width: 182.9 cm (72.01 in.)
Medium: Painting - oil on panel
Entered by: Member chris_mccormick on 31 May 2002.
Share
Tags
Rating
Average rating: No votes
Your rating:
Actions
Add artwork to a list
Send message about this artwork
Our Approach:
Here at The Athenaeum, we work very hard to make this site a sanctuary from the commercial web. We want to provide 99% of our content for free (and currently, *all* of it is free), and not to blast you with advertising. However, we are not a rich company or foundation. This site is a labour of love produced over many years by a couple of people. Since late 2000 when we started the site, we have invested thousands of dollars of our personal money to keep it going. Currently, the hosting service costs us about $200 a month. If you would like to support The Athenaeum, you can donate directly through Paypal below, or shop using any of the links on this page.
Purchase a hand-painted reproduction from 1st Art Gallery.

Buy posters or prints by Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema at Art.com